You are here

Fishing

Fishing -  Images courtesy Wild Fish Wild Places

If your dream is to snag a trophy walleye, wrestle a monster pike or land a Northern Alberta laker, fishing Alberta’s north is sure to get you hooked.

While many of these lakes and rivers are drive accessible, others offer the unique experience of fully outfitted lodges or rustic and isolated camps. Up north, you’ll find stellar fishing for pike, walleye, perch, lake trout and Arctic grayling. Most of the lakes and rivers are accessible from the main highways.

Convenient air access and connections from major centers make your trip an easy one. In addition to Highway 63, Highway 881 now provides fully paved secondary access to Fort McMurray and the great fishing locations in the Conklin area.

To view a map of this area, check out  Alberta Guide to Sportfishing Regulations  or log on to Alberta Outdoorsmen Forum.

No crowds, no stress fishing is the way of the north, and the northern operators you’ll find listed here can outfit you with all the gear, help you find the very best spots and pick just the right lure to land that big one. Whether you’re looking for the catch of a lifetime, wanting to spend some time in the great outdoors or a family looking for a fun vacation, fishing the north is the experience for you!

 

Related Articles

Community Stories

Did You Know

Camping & campfire tips

Remember that overnight camping and open fires are strictly prohibited in the Athabasca Dunes and all other ecological reserves.  Camping is permitted within the Wildland Park, but access is restricted to foot only. Due to its protected designation, off-highway vehicles are also not permitted within ecological reserves.

Protect our natural resources and reduce conflicts with the following camping tips:

  • Random campers should stay a minimum of 30 meters away from any watercourses
  • Respect other campers and keep noise down to an acceptable level
  • Practice no-trace camping

Follow the following fire safety tips in the Athabasca Sand Dunes and Wood Buffalo National Park:

  • Open fires must be used wisely. Even a small campfire has the potential to become an unmanageable wildfire.
  • Always be sure to use the fire receptacle provided in the campground.
  • If your campsite does not have a receptacle, build your fire on rocks and sand, in an open area (not under a tree).
  • Keep your campfire small.
  • Never leave your campfire unattended.
  • When extinguishing your campfire, soak it, then soak it again.
  • Remember your campfire is not out until you can touch it.